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My name is Mikhayla Hughes-Shaw and I am a multimedia journalist. I have experience covering breaking news, doing live shots, and also packaging stories. Take a look at my latest pieces.

Humanize My Hoodie

TRT: 1:45

Anchor Lead: AN IOWA CITY FASHION DESIGNER IS USING CLOTHING TO SEND A MESSAGE.  THE HUMANIZE MY HOODIE CAMPAIGN, IS STARTING A NATIONAL CONVERSATION TO HIGHLIGHT THE STRUGGLE OF BLACK MEN FEELING DEHUMANIZED. THE MESSAGE THE HOODIES SHARE IS ONE THAT SOME KNOW FAR TOO WELL. DITV REPORTER MIKHAYLA HUGHES-SHAW HAS THE STORY.

Humanize my hoodie. A simple phrase, with a complex meaning.  A meaning that Iowa City designer Andre Wright wants to share.

Stand up: “The Humanize My Hoodie campaign is a bold way to start the conversation about police brutality. And I’m going to get in on it today, too.

Wright: “When black men wear hoodies, there is a stigma of threat perception, that the police officers, or the officers carry.

This perceived threat, which may not be an actual threat to a police officer’s safety, has caused multiple killings of unarmed black men in America. From protests, to the NFL, people are speaking out.

Wright and his partner surveyed over 100 police officers, and discovered that appearance does matter.

Wright: “There are so many biases that’s included within a garment”

So, they launched a national campaign – selling hoodies, and attracting attention from celebrities, and even some performance artists, like the hip-hop duo Re-Fl3x. Re-Fl3x member Curtis Bell says he too has felt targeted while wearing a hoodie.

Bell: “They look at me like I’m up to something.”

He says that the campaign is important for continuing the conversation of respect.

Bell: “Instead of saying, alright ya’ll we need to stop wearing as many hoodies, or we need to stop doing this, because of this, he’s saying no – humanize my hoodie.”

And by continuing this conversation, Wright hopes that the result will be lasting change.

For now, there is still a message to send.

Reporting from Iowa City, this is Mikhayla Hughes-Shaw with DITV News.

 

Fetal Heartbeat Bill

TRT: 1:40

Anchor Lead:

A BILL IS MOVING THROUGH THE IOWA STATEHOUSE THAT COULD ELIMINATE MOST ABORTIONS IN THE STATE OF IOWA. THE FETAL HEARTBEAT BILL HAS CAUSED MANY IOWANS TO SPEAK OUT THIS WEEK. TODAY WAS NO EXCEPTION. AT THE STATEHOUSE DITV NEWS REPORTER MIKHAYLA HUGHES-SHAW HAS THE LATEST.

Discussions about the controversial fetal heartbeat bill continued today at the state capital, following heated and emotional statements from both legislatures and lobbyists alike over the past few days.

Sen Jeff Edler: If we are going to start breaking the culture of human violence, we need to start with the most delicate stage of life.

STAND UP: If passed, the fetal heartbeat bill will be the most restrictive abortion law in the United States. This will ban abortions after the detection of a fetal heartbeat, which can be as early as six weeks.

Democratic Senator Jeff Danielson says that this bill will limit healthcare choices for women, and could also put some at risk.

Jeff Danielson: I’m not sure that this actually achieves the goal of less abortions, right, because if you don’t have the choice here you are more likely to find it somewhere else, probably in a less safe setting.

Republican Senator Mark Segerbert says that this bill will lower the number of abortions, which will save more lives.

Mark Segerbart: “You know the natural thought here is that we know (that) a person is dead when the heartbeat stops; So doesn’t it follow logically that life must begin when the heartbeat starts or when you can detect a heartbeat?

The bill passed in the senate and now awaits a vote by the house of representatives. Reporting from Des Moines this is Mikhayla Hughes-Shaw with DITV News

 

Damaged Murals

TRT: 1:45

Anchor Lead:

RACIALLY MOTIVATED HATE SPEECH HAS BECOME A PRESSING ISSUE ON THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CAMPUS. FLYERS CONTAINING NAZI PROPAGANDA HAVE APPEARED ON CULTURAL CENTERS, CARS, AND IN LIBRARIES.  PERPETRATORS HAVE NOW TURNED TO VANDALIZING CAMPUS ARTWORK, AND THE ARTISTS ARE SPEAKING OUT. DITV REPORTER MIKHAYLA HUGHES-SHAW HAS THE STORY.

On the west side of the University of Iowa campus, students walk daily on this trail to get to class. Many also pass through this tunnel – full of artwork, highlighting the diversity of Latin American cultures.

Student artist Cassandra Garza shared this photo on twitter of the mural’s progress, but posted a video on March 20th showing damage caused by vandals.

The mural was ruined by nazi propaganda and other hateful symbols and phrases.

Across the Iowa River is a similar tunnel on the east side of campus, and an artist with a similar story.

Melissa Ortiz painted this mural in May 2017 to celebrate the National Pan Hellenic Council, which was created by historically black fraternities and sororities.   Ortiz shared that her piece, too, fell victim to hate.

Melissa Ortiz: “The AKA on the shoulder, someone engraved a swatstika. So, you know, it’s, it’s very upsetting.”

The murals are apart of a project sponsored by the University of Iowa student government to celebrate underrepresented identities on campus.

Stand Up: “University of Iowa officials responded to these actions responded to these actions, saying that the university does not support any kind of hat speech. Some students are really upset by what has been happening, and they’re asking for more security so that this does not happen again.”

The student government presidential elect Hira Mustafa took to twitter after the incident, saying that the school should purchase security cameras.

The UISG senators who founded this project shared that this idea has it’s limitations.

Abby Simon: “Most likely these are not feasible in the location, the tunnels are pretty isolated,”

Sanchez said that it is about much more than just security.

Sanchez: “A culture change does need to continue to happen.”

As for the tunnels, their damaged art still remains. Reporting from the UI campus, this is Mikhayla Hughes-Shaw with DITV.

 

 

 

 

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